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Cabins: A Guide to Building Your Own Nature Retreat Book
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Cabins: A Guide to Building Your Own Nature Retreat Book

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Do you dream of a log cabin? A lakeside view? An A-frame retreat? Cabin-building manual includes everything you need to know about building your own getaway. Stiles, 11" x 8 1/2", 240 pp.
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CABINS: A GUIDE TO BUILDING YOUR OWN NATURE RETREAT BOOK DESCRIPTION
Contents

Foreword
Introduction
Chapter One - Cabin Planning

Chapter Two - Types of Cabin Construction
    Pole Built Cabins
    Stick Built Cabins
    Post and Beam Cabins
    Stone Cabins
    Cordwood Cabins
    Wood Siding

Chapter Three - Cabin Construction
    Hand Cart
    Site Preparation
    Foundations
    Windows and Doors
    Ladders and Stairs
    Insulation and Roofing
    Electricity
    Water
    Plumbing & Sanitary Systems
   Heating

Chapter Four - Log Cabins
    Log Joints
    Cutting Your Own Logs
    Working with Logs
    Two-Bedroom Log Cabin

Chapter Five - Cabin Designs
    Helen's Writing Cabin
    Pyramid Cabin
    A-Frame Cabin
    Pole Built Cabin
    Timber-Framed Guest Cabin
    Lakeside Cabin
    Japanese Moongazing Cabin
    Mediterranean Cabin

Chapter Six - Outfitting a Cabin
   Classic Cabin Accessories
   Protecting Your Cabin

Bibliography
Sources
Index
Notes

Excerpt from page 120
Chinking
If you are building a log cabin you will need to provide some caulking or chinking between the logs to make them air tight and to keep out bugs and mosquitoes. How much caukling or chinking you will need depends on the amount of space there is between the logs. For instance the Swedish cope and some of the milled log types of log construction will require only a couple of thin beads of caukling applied with a cauking gun. On the other hand some hand-hewn log cabins may have 4" spaces between the logs then requiring major chinking. Early log cabin builders used moss stuffed in-between the logs. This help up pretty well since it was flexible and compressed as the logs settled. A modern-day alternative is a 6" wide Fiberglas sill sealer sold commercially at most building supply yards and used extensively to build houses. This is a good choice if you are using unseasoned logs as they will undoubtedly settle and shrink over the first two to three years at which time you can apply a permanent type of chinking.


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