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Newspaper Brick Maker
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Newspaper Brick Maker

Item #17120626
11 reviews
In Stock
Today's Price: $32.95
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A great way to recycle newspapers and an invaluable tool used in parts of the world where firewood is not readily available. Compressed wet newspaper dries into 8-1/2" x 3-1/4" bricks that burn at the rate of about 4 per hour. Just soak newspaper (mix with sawdust and chopped grass if desired) and fill brick maker, then press down on handles. Remove brick and allow to dry, then use like wood in your stove.
  • Made of heavy painted steel
  • 10-1/4"L x 5-1/4"H
  • 5-3/4lb
  • Imported
Note: Paper bricks should not be used in a catalytic stove as the smoke may damage the catalyst.

Customer Reviews of Newspaper Brick Maker
Product Rating: 3.5 out of 5.0(11 reviews)
Showing comments 1-10 of 11 (Next 10)
- 5/8/2013
said: TJ
"I've owned this for 2 years, and have made over 200 bricks, which I used last winter in the pacific nw, with no problems. If you had problems with paper going out of the bottom, brace the bottom with a simple clamp, and don't overfill. I take whole newspaper, put into a large plastic container, add hot water, a little bleach, shred with my hands, and place into form, press out the water, and let dry in the sun. Whole process takes about 2 hours, although drying takes a few days."
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- 1/12/2013
said: Anonymous User
"I dunno about the low rating guys and how they are breaking this tool. You don't have to overload the tool with wet newspaper either. I think one whole news paper should be sufficient enough. Also how is it dangerous? You must be a complete idiot to injure yourself. I'd hate to see you work with a hammer or a hacksaw. Also, why do you need to soak it for several days to a week? I just grab 3 whole sheets at a time, run it in warm to mildly hot water and crumble it and put it in the tool. Fill it to the top and compress it to squeeze out all the water. Takes like a day or two to dry in a warm room. "
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- 2/20/2011
said: Steve
"Just loaned out my brick maker ( John and Judy in Fossil, Oregon). With luck they hope to get a community brick project going--lots of sawdust and paper available.Lessons Learned from making bricks:* Don’t leave the pulp mixture soaking too long–a nasty smelling odor was evident when I left it soaking about 10 days. Did not go away–even after the bricks were made and dried. I'd suggest 1-3 days only to soak the mixture.*Warm or hot water and a SMALL amount of bleach is the best way to break down the paper–shredded/crosscut office paper and junk mail is what I use*Best mixture I tried was a 50/50 (by weight) mixture of office paper and sawdust*Still need to find the best wood (sawdust) to make a better smelling brick–I suspect Juniper or Cedar might be the best–but I don’t have any to test*After sun drying for a day or two, bricks can be placed on a wire shelf. A fan at one end of the shelf will greatly speed the drying time needed. If you live in the Mojave Desert you can dry these fast in the summer!"
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- 5/22/2012
said: Amy
"I have used the brick maker several times already to make newspaper bricks. I found the instructions that were sent with the product to be very helpful in using the brick maker. I have apparently applied too much force once, which I did not think possible. The perforated bottom plate popped through the bottom guards on the black brick frame while I was making a brick. It took a little doing to remove the plate. I had to use a hammer! I understand that the perforated plate needs to be flexible in order to remove the brick from the mold. You might include in the instructions not to be too aggressive when pressing the water out of the wet paper pulp. I had it spraying from the perforations when this happened! I have found that if I am a little more patient, and drain the water a little better before adding the pulp to the brick maker, that I am able to form the brick without this problem recurring. Also, I have used the technique of soaking the chopped/shredded paper for 1-2 days, then (in batches) processing it in my blender with lots of water. This makes a nice pulp, which is easily drained in a colander. I collect the water from the colander to reuse for the next batch. I have been able to make about 6 bricks at a time from the amount of shredded paper that fills an average size mop bucket. The paper bricks themselves have been odorless, but when I tried to add dried leaves and grasses that I chopped up, the odor was quite foul. I would not recommend that. I am interested to see how these bricks will work this winter."
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- 1/21/2012
said: Bill
"Does make the bricks as described. Is messy as described. Brickmaker does a good job."
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- 12/4/2011
said: Loretta
"Really like the product however, living in Florida this is not something we do every day, so was a little disappointed when the instructions didn't come with it.Especially since the packing slip stated with instruction. After a phone call all we received was sheet from the web site."
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- 4/19/2011
said: Brooks King
"Our intention was to use this to recycle our local paper into something useable. The handles need some sort of padding, as they are very uncomfortable when applying pressure. The narrow sides need drain holes - as one compresses the sodden mass inside, some of the water percolates up and then has nowhere to go. The pressure basket (the piece with the two steel rods that applies pressure to the wet paper) needs to be beefier - we made 9 bricks the first evening we had this item and the basket is bent. Great idea and looks good, but I question whether or not it will stand up for another 9 bricks."
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- 9/25/2010
said: Sean
"Well made, but takes a bit of time to learn to get it. my first dozen bricks simply fell apart when dry, you really need to pack it in there."
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- 4/24/2013
said: Anonymous User
"Nice concept, but had the same issue another rater had. One of the press handles is wider than the other and it slides off the end of the cross bar on the press plate very easily. If you are aware of this it can be avoided, but on my first use of the product it happened, and I cut my fingers pretty good."
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- 10/5/2012
said: Vinny
"Extremely poor quality. Made two bricks and the third one blew out the bottom. The sides bend and bow out when you press down. It's sheet metal riveted together. After some welding it does make a pretty good brick but at this price I expected it to be built a LOT better."
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