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American Style Scythe Wooden Snath Handle
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American Style Scythe Wooden Snath Handle

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Seasoned ash with varnished finish. Fittings of malleable iron for American-style blades.
  • About 60"L
  • 5 lb.
  • Made in USA

Note: To adjust the handles, you must turn the entire handle (not the recessed nut). It has a reverse thread, which means you need to turn the handle to the left to tighten and to the right to loosen.


Customer Reviews of American Style Scythe Wooden Snath Handle
Product Rating: 3.0 out of 5.0(3 reviews)
Showing comments 1-3 of 3
- 11/28/2011
said: Benjamin
"Seymour has been making scythe snaths for a long time, and while not as refined or polished as older examples from the golden days of this remarkable too, they still put out a fine product. It's important to note that the threads on the nibs (handles) traditionally reversed, so you loosen them by twisting them to the right, and tighten them by twisting them to the left. This was to help prevent the nibs from loosening during use. While many retailers of Austrian scythes like to bash the old American pattern, there's a very good reason it was used so widely in this nation--IT WORKED. And more than that, it worked very well indeed. Their manner of use is TOTALLY DIFFERENT from Austrian pattern scythes, so bear that in mind when learning to use it. The American scythe does a much better job than the Austrian pattern when tackling goldenrod, weeds, and coarse grasses, and the swing is more adaptable to uneven ground. For some excellent details on the use of the American scythe, see "The Young Farmer's Manual," which is free to read through Google Books."
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- 7/19/2011
said: Bob
"While the wood is lovely and the shape is good, the handles are 1) loose and 2) not adjustable. What? This could be a premium product if a bit more care went into manufacturing. I'm going to have to remove the handles and make my own. What a pain."
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- 12/1/2010
said: Pete McLaughlin
"good point. the wood quality and finish was good. bad points: the steel blade mount head was a sloppy fit to the handle so it allows the blade to wobble. the holes in the handle for mounting the blade and the keeper bolt on the head were drilled in the wrong place. the nibs (handles) have a nut on their ends that will not turn so one handle is in the wrong position for me but cannot be changed. the top handle is loose and will not tighten. i can fix the blade holder with JB weld and redrilling the holes but have not figured out what to do with the nibs."
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Showing comments 1-3 of 3